Mitsubishi’s Apology Triggers Domino Effect

Published: 21 July 2015

If you’re going to apologise for something, consider the full range of affected parties and their likely reaction before making a public statement. 

By offering a "most remorseful apology" and saying that Mitsubishi felt "a deep sense of ethical responsibility for a past tragedy" the Japanese executive both admitted fault and expressed shame. 

Relatives of UK prisoners of war have urged Mitsubishi to extend its apology to all prisoners subjected to forced labour during the Second World War after its historic apology to US POWs at the weekend.

There have also been calls for other Japanese companies to follow Mitsubishi’s lead and apologise for their own behaviour during the war.

So why has Mitsubishi’s unprecedented apology received a mixed response and triggered an apology ‘domino’ effect?

In many ways, the apology from Hikaru Kimura, senior executive officer at Mitsubishi Materials Corporation, was a textbook example in how to apologise and protect your reputation.

By offering a “most remorseful apology” and saying that Mitsubishi felt “a deep sense of ethical responsibility for a past tragedy” the Japanese executive both admitted fault and expressed shame.

To read the full article, visit PR Week here.

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