Improving Communications for Pension Providers

Published: 16 April 2017

It’s never been more important to get the message, the medium and the messenger right when communicating with customers, to help them make informed retirement decisions.

The changes to pensions rules have been a subject of almost constant discussion among financial services providers for the past three years.

‘I’ve got a challenge for you.
Say something about the recent pension freedoms that hasn’t been said already.’

That was the challenge set by Gregg McClymont, Head of Retirement at Aberdeen Asset Management, as Chair of a recent Financial Services Forum event on communicating with customers about pensions.

The changes to pensions rules have been a subject of almost constant discussion among financial services providers for the past three years, which made Gregg’s challenge a tough one. But the panellists achieved it.

What struck me at the event is how much attention is going into evolving and improving the ways in which we communicate with customers on pensions and retirement issues. It makes sense.

Recent changes are still fresh in many customers’ minds, and there is the possibility of more changes by the next Government. I’d argue it’s never been more important to get the message, the medium and the messenger right when communicating with customers, to help them make informed retirement decisions.

To read the full article, visit the FS Forum here.

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